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Us 35, Russia 27, Moscow 15, Anna 15, Snowden 10, Jay Leno 8, Cnn 8, U.s. 8, Obama 7, Spiriva 6, United States 6, Vladimir Putin 6, Edward Snowden 6, Ariel Castro 5, San Diego 5, Jessica Yellin 5, Filner 4, Butler 4, Jason Johnson 4, James Dimaggio 4,
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  CNN    CNN Newsroom    News/Business. Latest on the day's top news stories  
   with a focus on global news, trends and destinations. New.  

    August 7, 2013
    6:00 - 8:01am PDT  

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well, that's it for us here on "new day" "cnn newsroom" with anna begins right now. >> thank you, nice it see you guys. happening now in "newsroom." president obama sitting on jay leno's couch for 45 minutes talking about terror, lunch with hillary, the olympics and trayvon martin. >> there are some things that we can do to foster better understanding and to make sure that we don't have laws in place that encourage the kind of violent encounter. plus, an emotional plea and a massive manhunt. a father and a personal message to his kidnapped daughter. >> hannah, we all love you very much. if you have a chance, you take it. you run. you'll be found. also, help wanted. hundreds of millions of dollars and thousands of jobs coming to
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tennessee. the best business story you will hear all day. plus, this -- >> my father spent three years restoring this car. it is his love. it is his passion. >> it's his fault he didn't lock the garage. >> for sale. the house that made it famous from "ferris bueller's day off" on the market. "newsroom" starts right now. good morning from new york, i'm anna coren sitting in for carol costello. president obama makes a return appearance to late night tv, but this time very few laughs and lots of serious topics. in an appearance on "tonight show" the president and jay leno discuss everything from the empassioned trayvon martin case to the terror concerns that have shut down 19 u.s. embassies and
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consulates around the world. and in one of the lighter moments the president looked ahead to hillary clinton's potential run to succeed him. >> you and hillary had lunch. who invited who to lunch? i'm curious. >> i invited her and we had a great time. she had had that post-administration glow. you know, when folks leave the white house. like two weeks later, they look great. it was a wonderful conversation. by the end of my first term, you know, we had been b come genuinely close and i could not have more respect for her. she was a great secretary of state. >> yeah. >> very proud of what she did. >> did you notice her measuring the drapes or anything like that? >> keep in mind, she's been there before. >> that's true. >> she doesn't have to measure them. >> everyone is concerned about these embassy closings. how significant is this threat? >> well, it's significant enough that we're taking every precaution.
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we had already done a lot to bolster embassy security around the world, but especially in the middle east, north africa where the threats tend to be highest and whenever we see a threat stream that we think is specific enough that we can take some specific precautions w s within certain time frame, we do so. >> safe to say that we learned about these threats through the nsa program? >> we have some mechanisms where we can track a phone number or an e-mail address that we know is connected to some sort of terrorist threat. and, you know, that information is useful. but, what i've said before, i want to make sure i repeat. and that is, we should be skeptical about the potential encroachments on privacy. none of the revelations show that government has abused these
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powers, but they're pretty significant powers. and i've been talking to congress and civil libertarians and others about are there additional ways that we can make sure that the people know. no one is listening to your phone call. >> were you surprised that russia granted snowden asylum? >> i was disappointed. because, you know, even though we don't have an extradition treaty with them, traditionally we have tried to respect if there's a law breaker or an alleged law braeaker in their country. we evaluate it and we try to work with them. they didn't do that with us and in some ways it's reflective of some underlying challenges that we had with russia lately. >> i thought you spoke very eloquently about the trayvon martin case. and i could tell that you were speaking from the heart. and tell me about that. >> well, you know, i think all of us were troubled by what
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happened. and any of us who are parents can imagine the heart ache that parents went through. we were talking off stage, you know, you're a teenager, especially a teenage boy, you're going to mess up. and you won't always have the best judgment. but what i think all of us agree to is that we should have a criminal justice system that is fair, that is just and what i wanted to try to explain was why this was a particularly sensitive topic for african-american families because, you know, a lot of people who have sons know the experience they had at being followed or being viewed suspiciously. we all know that, you know, young african-american men disproportionately have involvement in criminal activities and violence. for a lot of reasons.
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a lot of it having to do with poverty and a lot having to do with disruptions in their neighborhoods and their communities. failing schools and all those things. and that's no excuse. but what we also believe in is that people, everybody, should be treated fairly and the system should work for everyone. >> let me ask you something. you told a group of young people that broccoli was your favorite food. now, lying to voters is one thing, lying to children. that's -- >> can you put your right hand on the bible -- >> i have broccoli a lot. you can ask my staff. it is one of my staples. me and broccoli, i don't know, we have a thing going. it goes especially well with burgers and fries, absolutely. >> did michelle make a broccoli cake with broccoli icing. >> i wouldn't go that far. >> mr. president, it's been an
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honor. i know you have to go. >> well, jay, i know you're proud of your car collection. >> yeah. >> there's one piece that's missing. >> cool! >> this is the beast. the one i drive in. >> will you sign the roof? >> i will sign the roof. >> oh, cool. >> the doors are heavy when you're getting in. you may need a little help. >> i assume the real car will be at my garage after the show tonight. >> there you go, jay. >> mr. president, a pleasure and an honor, sir. thank you very much. >> what a conversation. the president covered such an extraordinary range of topics and we want to break down some of those comments for you. for that, we can turn to cnn white house correspondent bre brianna keilar and hln contributor jason johnson. great to have you both with us. brianna, if i could start with
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you. this was the first time that president obama commented on those heightened terror alerts. and, yet, he chose "the tonight show" with jay leno. is this the right forum and the right platform to get his message across? >> you know, i think what the white house would say is when they're on something like "the tonight show" the president is able to get a very wide audience. but i also think some people will say, hey, is this really a serious forum and, also, just the fact that president obama if he's going to be questioned one-on-one by a journalist versus jay leno, the questions are going to be tougher. he's going to be pressed, i think, a little more on other things. i think the white house is looking for the reach here, but i think there is certainly some criticism that you can make of the fact that he's not really going to get tough questions and he sort of looks to this show. this is the sixth time that he's been on it. it is something that president obama has kind of sort of made a
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main stay of him for. not something sitting presidents did. this is what he considers to be a friendly forum. >> a friendly forum and, also, as you say, a very popular show. a lot of people are watching. jason, if i can ask you. you know, we know that 19 embassies, consulates are closed until saturday and are we learning more information about these heightened terror alerts? drone strikes in yemen, two possible plots that were foiled there. do you think that the president was able to elallay people's fears. >> he was able to explain the rational behind what he was doing. he addresses the fact without getting into benghazi very much that the united states needs to be careful. and i think he honored the embassy employees by talking about how dangerous the circumstances were. the president is going to take lot of heat for this. some on the republican party think this is a cowardly move and we look afraid, but he had the opportunity to explain
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himself. >> and not just terror alerts. there were a whole spectrum of topics that were covered. snowden in russia, he expressed his disappointment at russia granting temporary asylum to. what is your take on the discussion? >> i think it was like a six-month review of his second term. if you really think about it, barack obama has been under so much pressure from boston and from trying to pass gun control and then benghazi and then the irs scandal. he hasn't had an opportunity to sit down and really talk to the public. this is what i have been doing for the last six, seven months. i think he spent a lot more time talking about what may have been wrong with trayvon martin than what some of the martin supporters would have heard about. what he said about edward snowden made sense. but i think it was a good review. obama got to actually speak
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about himself, which he hasn't done so far. >> brianna keilar, jason johnson, great to have you with us. thank you. we'll speak a bit later. well, coming up at 9:30, we'll hear more of president obama's interview with jay leno last night. including what he had to say about russia, hosting the olympics and recent legislation that cracks down on gay rights. that's coming up at the bottom of the hour. well, happening right now the site of three women's decade in hell is being obliterated. one woman returns to witness the demolition. michelle knight handed out balloons to people in the cleveland neighborhood that first got national attention three months ago with the rescue from ariel castro's house. knight told reporters the balloons symbolized missing children and she went on to read a prayer. >> the missing people's strength and power to know that they are loved. we hear their cries.
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they are never forgotten in my heart. they are caterpillars waiting to turn into a butterfly. they are never forgotten. they are loved. >> michelle, tell the people who are watching this why you felt it was important to be here today? >> why it was important to be here today is because nobody was there for me when i was missing. and i want the people out there to know, including the mothers, they can have strength and they can have hope and their child will come back. they will. just have the love in god and you'll see, they'll come back. >> what an amazingly strong woman. cnn martin savidge is covering the demolition and, martin, i can only imagine a real mix of pain, yet relief there at the site right now. explain it to us. >> yeah.
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that's exactly right. take a look. i mean, you can see that the house is pretty much knocked flat on the ground and they've done this in about an hour and a half worth of work. of course, it really wasn't a big home to begin with. 1,400 square feet. but not the size of the home, it was, of course, what the home represents and it has been common referred to house of horrors and the fact that those three women were held inside for so long and treated so terribly. so, as part of the plea agreement, ariel castro the man who held them hostage, he had to give up his home and the city wasted no time tearing it down. one very interesting moment, the first blow that was landed by the excavator, that big giant piece of caterpillar equipment was actually operated by the aunt of gina dejesus. so, she was allowed to sort of give that first blow. i asked her, how did that feel to sort of deliver this? she said it felt great and then she broke down into tears and
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said, really, this is a moment of closure for them to finally be rid of that house and that's true for everyone on the street that is entirely true for the city of cleveland. this is closure and a kind of retributi retribution. >> martin, you mentioned that ariel castro had to sign over the deed of the house. as part of the plea deal to escape the death penalty. it's interesting, prosecutors said he actually cried when he did this because of the happy memories that he shared there with those three women. quite extraordinary to think that this is his state of mind. we heard from michelle knight a little bit earlier. did you get a chance to speak to her, as well? >> didn't get a chance to speak to her because they're very careful about any exposure to her. so, the moment she arrived on site, almost like a head of state arriving. everyone is told to sort of stay in position. so, we were not allowed to move. those that may have been close
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were fortunate, but we couldn't. however, i will say that we had sort of anticipated something like that. michelle knight has been the most outspoken and outgoing. she was the one that was actually at the sentencing and she faced down ariel castro in the courtroom and she is a small woman, but tremendously strong and her stature has been overwhelming to many in cleveland. they cannot get enough of her, as the other two women, because they are glad to see them, at least on the road to recovery and even more glad to see that house now a pile of rubble. they're going to be very careful here to make sure that that rubble is not going to end up as a kind of souvenir for anyone. as these trucks leave, they're escorted to make sure nothing goes into the wrong hands. anna? >> martin, as you say, a day of closure for those families and those three women in particular. martin savidge, good to see you.
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thank you. this hour southern california is on alert. a suspected killer and child kidnapper is on the run. well, the father of the two missing children issues a heartbreaking plea just days after their mother's body is found in the smoldering ruins of the suspect's house. investigators say the man they are looking for is james dimaggio and he may have shaved his head and this is what he could look like now. with each passing hour, there is a sense of a desperation and it obviously grows. cnn miguel marquez has spent a long time compiling information and joins us now from san diego. miguel, what do you have for us? >> time is critical here, anna. they consider mr. dimaggio dangerous and possibly armed. dozens of tips have come into sheriff's office here and only takes that one in order to bring this to closure. overnight, a vigil of hope for children allegedly kidnapped by this man, james dimaggio.
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>> we all miss you, hannah. we love you so much. we're here. we're altogether and we're all praying for you. >> reporter: following an emotional appeal from the children's father, brett anderson. >> jim, i can't fathom what you were thinking. the damage is done. i'm begging you to let my daughter go. you've taken everything else. >> reporter: speaking directly to jim dimaggio, the man who investigators believe killed anderson's ex-wife and possibly his 8-year-old son. then kidnapped his 16-year-old daughter, hannah. >> hannah, we all love you very much. if you have a chance, you take it. you run. you'll be found. >> reporter: the body of the children's mother, 42-year-old christina anderson was found on sunday night inside dimaggio's burning home. investigators believe dimaggio set the fire. deputies also found the body of a child who has not been identified. the case leading to california's
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first statewide amber alert over smartphones late monday night. road signs calling motorists' attention to the nationwide alert investigators anxious to catch a break. >> it is safe to say that he is a very dangerous person. armed or not. it would be safe to assume he's armed. that's why we're asking any members of the public to believe they see him. don't try to contact him or detain him or anything, just call 911. >> reporter: investigators updating pictures of the kids and the alleged kidnapper and even a mock up of a bald james dimaggio just in case he shaved his head to disguise his appearance. now, dimaggio may be in a blue nissan versa. he may have changed cars by now. investigators say he may have changed his appearance and if ethan and hannah are with him, their appearance may have changed, as well. if you suspect something and think it might be them, call
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911. don't confront them. >> miguel marquez, we appreciate it, thank you. we have breaking news coming into us here at cnn. we're getting word that president obama has canceled his moscow summit with russian president vladimir putin, that's according to a white house official. now, we do understand that, obviously, on "the tonight show" on jay leno last night president obama said he was still going to attend the g-20 and disappointed at russia's decision to grant a temporary asylum to nsa leaker edward snowden. but it appears we just got word our chief white house correspondent jessica yellin just confirmed that with a white house official that president obama has canceled his moscow summit. so, that is what we are hearing right now. as soon as we get more details, we'll certainly bring that to you. stay with us, much more after the break.
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this&is gonna be big. hp moonshot. it's time to build a better enterprise. together. welcome back. let's get more on that breaking news coming out of the white house that president barack obama has decided to cancel his moscow summit with russian
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president vladimir putin. we can only presume that is in response to russia's decision to grant a temporary asylum to nsa leaker edward snowden. for much more on this story, let's go to our chief white house correspondent jessica yellin. >> hi, anna. well, you know, the president and the white house have been working on this decision for some time. and the understanding that they would go to moscow was based in part on years of developing relationship with russia. the president hoped not just on this trip but to develop some sort of missile defense some agreement for a missile reduction internationally, as well as perhaps some peace with iran on their nuclear agreement. i mean, some very large questions hang out over this summit that are much larger than simply the question of what to do with edward snowden.
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so, they took some time, obviously, as they wrestled with the question of whether the president should go or not. but as i'm now reporting, according to several officials, the president has decided that he will not go to moscow at the end of this trip and sit down with russian president putin. you know, none of us is entirely surprised by this because they certainly have a number of reasons not to be there right now. the u.s. president to be in moscow on the same streets that edward snowden might be wandering freely. if they can't come to an agreement to somehow return snowden even somehow indirectly while the president is there, that would be perhaps awkward for the president. also the question of sochi, the upcoming olympics in which gays and lesbians are not being given full, equal attention that
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heterosexuals are given. and there's a chill between obama and putin, to be frank. if they cannot make progress at these summits, leaders agree they shouldn't go. so, for all those reasons, it's my understanding that he won't go. now, i'm waiting on a statement from the white house or some sort of communication from somebody internally. you know they're going to explain this at some point and we'll find out what their logic is. but what we should believe is that this is snowden, but also sochi and then a general chill between these two men that makes progress on any of these important issues, including missile reduction, iran, syria, very difficult anyway, anna. >> jessica, just for clarification, the moscow summit, does that coincide with the g-20. we heard from the president on "tonight show" last night
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basically saying that he would still attend the g-20 in september. >> they're part of the same trip, but two separate stops. so, the g-20 is hosted by russia in st. petersburg and the idea is that putin invited him to have a separate sit down in moscow, one-on-one and also attend the g-20. sort of considered diplomatic etiquette for the world powers to sit down for the president to sit down with the leader who invites him in his country in a one-on-one summit and, also, attend the major summit. in this case, it could seem awkward for the president. the g-20 is gagering of developing nations. sit with 18 other presidents of developing countries and not visit with president putin, who is very powerful leader, clearly. so, to answer your simple question, no, they're two separate stops.
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but the very same trip. so, the president making it clear they will still be going to the g-20 summit, which is also in russia in st. petersburg and i should make it clear the president will see putin in st. petersbu petersburg. they're still going to be at the same event, just not have that separate visit apart in moscow together. >> they want to have that sit-dosit sitdown. so a snub to the russian president. jessica, i want to play some sound on what president barack obama had to say about the issue of the olympics and the gay and lesbian issue. let's take a listen to this. >> you know, i think putin and russia have a big stake in making sure the olympics work and i think they understand that for most of the countries that participate in the olympics, you know, we wouldn't tolerate gays and lesbians being treated differently. they are athletes, they're there to compete and if russia wants to uphold the olympic spirit,
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then every judgment should be made on the track or in the swimming pool or on the balance beam. and people's sexual orientation shouldn't have anything to do with it. >> so, jessica, that message, obviously, won't be had or won't get across during that one-on-one because it's now taking place between the two presidents. but will the united states still perhaps get this message across to russia? >> well, first of all, i think he did. the answer is yes. i don't know that he'll have an opportunity to say it directly to putin, but i imagine he will. and i think you'll hear the president say that in other venues and other occasions between now and the olympics. this is, i would say, one of the defining issues of his presidency. is his push for expanded rights for gays and lesbians, not just
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here, but around the world. i am confident that he will continue to press this message. but i should also tell you that the administration official tells me the reason that they have canceled this trip is not just about snowden and not just about sochi, but also because there was a lack of progress on their whole agenda, which includes, reach agreement on arms control, missile defense, any effort to reach some agreements on human rights in russia. civil society. it's clear that they're not seeing eye to eye. and you know how these things actually work is they try to sort of prearrange some sort of progress that the two leaders can announce at the end of an event, a summit. it's clear they couldn't get to something. so, there is a whole host of reasons. edward snowden being the most obvious right now. >> a very strained relationship now between the united states and russia.
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chief white house correspondent jessica yellin, we appreciate the update. thank you. stay with cnn. much more after the break.
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welcome back. let's turn our attention to southern california. 13 women have come forward to accuse san diego's mayor of sexually harassing them. now bob filner has a new group of accusers. military veterans and in a cruel twist, they say he preyed upon them after learning they were sexually abused in the service. k an extraordinary story. tell us about these latest allegations. >> well, the latest allegations, anna, are a bit separate from the others because of who these women are. these are retired and former military veterans. many of them haare victims of re and sexual harassment. the then congressman used his
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considerable power to access their support group even leaving one of them an unwanted voicemail. >> it's your newly favorite congressman bob filner. >> yeah, it was kind of creepy. >> reporter: the voice sounded like then congressman bob filner while donna lewis hernandez met him a year ago at a veterans event. but the problem for hernandez isn't just the voicemail, it's how filner made advances and to whom. >> we felt like we could trust him because he's always fighting for our cause. >> reporter: fernandez is a retired usair force sergeant and said she was raped three times while in the military. jerry was in the army and said she also was raped. filner met them at support groups for sexual assault victims and made unwanted
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advances. >> we are all victims of military sexual assault and it appears it me that he was targeting this organization and hitting on the women in this organization because they were easy prey. so, he's part of an organization that's against sexual assault and sexual violence towards women and sexual harassment. but he's doing the very thing that we are fighting to make stop in our service and in our country. >> reporter: do you feel he was using his power to prey on the women of this organization? >> i do. i do. he didn't have our backs. he was looking at our backs. >> it's wrong. why would you come here with us and do what you did? why? is it a turn on? >> reporter: the 70-year-old ten-term congressman served as chairman of the house veterans affair committee. now, less than a year after being elected san diego's mayor he checked himself into a
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two-week program to deal with his behavior. his chief of staff would not speak to us about these latest allegations. >> will you come back out? >> i will do my best. >> and in case you're wondering, she never actually opened that door for our cameras. did not come out to speak with us. the office later coming out a spokesperson saying they had no comment and the mayor's office not saying anything. as far as filner's personal lawyer, he also had no comment. >> as you mentioned in your piece, mayor filner is seeking two weeks intense treatment, whatever that means. but how are people feeling about the fact that he's hanging on and he's refusing to step down and resign? >> you know, if you look at the local newspaper at a poll that they did, it's overwhelming. 70 something percent want the mayor to step down. if you actually speak to the people, the women who are accusing the mayor of sexual
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harassment, they call this two-week therapy session an absolute ruse, a joke. they want him to step down and be at absolutely no cost to the taxpayers. there is a recall effort under way, but that is going to be, at some cost to the taxpayers and that will take some time. >> excellent reporting, as always. lovely to see you. well, stay with "newsroom" much more after the break. alert.
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breathing a sigh of relief after his 5-year-old son nearly drowned in the family pool. the incident comes just 13 months after the grammy winner's former stepson died after he was badly hurt in a boating accident. he was just 11. tori is following the story from los angeles. what details do we have?
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>> police say usher went to the hospital to be with his son right after this near drowning. the boy's mother tells cnn he's doing okay. investigators are also telling me that at this point they have no reason to believe that there is any criminal aspect to this case. one thing is for sure, this is every parents' worst noit mare. >> is he breathing? >> is he breathing? is he breathing? >> reporter: he is music superstar usher's 5-year-old son. >> he is breathing. >> reporter: the frantic 911 call was placed by the boy's aunt in atlanta. police say usher raymond v fell to the bottom of the pool where he became stuck in the drain. >> yes, my nephew was in the pool and he, he went and i couldn't get him. i tried to get him. >> reporter: that's when police say two contractors working inside the house came to the rescue. they got them out and they're
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doing cpr on him. >> reporter: the child was conscious, alert and breathing when taken to the hospital. connecticut mom karen knows the terror all too well. two years ago her 6-year-old son, zach, drowned in a pool drain accident. >> once you're stuck, 450 to 900 pounds of pressure. >> reporter: karen and her husband started the zach foundation to increase awareness. teaching the abc and ds of pool safety. >> and then the d for drain safety. a is for adult supervision, b is for barriers around pools and bodies of water, c is for classes. >> reporter: like the ones that teach cpr, which may have saved usher's son. the mega star can also relate to the loss of a child. just last summer that his 11-year-old stepson died after a boating accident. the singer spoke about the tragedy with oprah. less than a year later, one of his other sons is recovering from a pool accident that could have been much worse.
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and, anna, i have this late breaking update for you. in response to the near drowning incident the attorney for the boy's mother just confirmed to me that she filed for an emergency custody hearing. in those court documents she alleged the children aren't being looked after properly by usher and we are told this hearing is set to take place this friday in atlanta. >> tory, we appreciate the update. thank you. well, does this house look familiar? what if it was a bright red ferrari crashing through the back window? well, it could be yours, if you got the cash. hd
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to texas expect more testimony from the shooting rampage at ft. hood. nidal hasan declared that, "i am the shooter." he is accused of killing 13 people and wounding 32 in the attack back in 2009. hasan is serving as his own lawyer although he refused to question two survivors who took the stand for the prosecution. our ed lavandera is there with the very latest. ed, what can we expect today? >> well, this is hardly your regular ordinary kind of capital murder trial. but, what you see going on here is prosecutors continuing their fight to ensure that major nidal
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hasan is sentenced to the death penalty. meanwhile, he doesn't pay a lot of attention to the guilt or innocence of this trial. he is fighting his own war trying to show he was justified in killing 13 american sole skrrs and wouskrr and wounding 30 more. >> reporter: this morning military prosecutors will continue calling survivors to testify against major nadal husane. heaavy security and rows of massive steel containers. major hasan is flown in by helicopter and in court he is dressed in an army combat uniform with an american flag decorating his sleeve. yesterday he quickly admitted to killing defenseless fellow soldiers. the evidence will clearly show i am the shooter, he declared in an opening statement. hasan went on to say, i was on the wrong side and i switched sides. prosecutors say he felt a jihad
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duty to kill as many soldiers as possible and that he was targeting soldiers preparing to fight in afghanistan. >> i got shot twice in the lower back. >> reporter: 41-year-old christopher royal is one of those victims preparing to stare down hasan in court. the officer is recovering from his wounds, nerve damage down his arms, back and legs and the trauma is more for this married father of a young boy. >> i don't go to places. i don't go to the mall any more. i can't take my child to disneyland because i can't deal with it. i can't take my child to six flags because i can't deal with it. >> reporter: he considers hasan a terrorist but has forgiven him. every day he goes by the fort hood memorial remembering his fallen comrades. >> when i go by the site it continues to help me go on because there were 13 that day that didn't make it. that kind of pushes me through.
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>> ed, i'm going to pick up here, if you don't mind. >> the shooting victim testified yesterday afternoon and a lot of people are going to be paying close attention because the irony in all of this is that major hasan representing himself, he does have the opportunity to cross examine his own victims. but staff sergeant alonzo lunsford testified yesterday and major hasan was given a chance to cross examine him, he said he had no questions. many people called to the stand and many people paying close attention with how he handles that interaction with his own victims. anna? >> this trial is not televised. media access is limited. i know you have been allowed to go into the courtroom. tell us about nadal hasan's
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appearance and also his demeanor in court. we seem to be having some technical problems there, unfortunately. that was ed lavandera reporting on the trial of major nadal has hasan. coming up on "newsroom" -- >> honey, jesus was at the table. jesus was at that table. >> oprah winfrey talking racism. her return to the big screen and why quitting her new tv network was never an option. that's all new in the 10:00 a.m. hour of "newsroom." join us for that.
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who doesn't know this movie scene? >> i can't wait to see the look on his face. >> anyone? i have to admit it's one of my favorite movies. 1986, "ferris bueller's day
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off"". well, if you always liked that glass house made famous by the movie, good news. it can be yours for about $1.5 million. well, it's up for sale in the chicago suburb of highland park. it's partly suspended over a ravine. it's about 4,000 square feet, four bedrooms and four baths and comes complete with the glass gaj garage. this is the second time the house has been on the market. in 2009, it was listed for $2.3 million, but there were no takers. so $1.5 million. it's bargain. well, a bench-clearing brawl nearly breaks out between the braves and nashs last night. the battle didn't stop on the field. annie shows joins us for more in this morning's bleacher report. >> good morning. we've all seen teams brawl on the field in baseball. now they're taking the fight to twitter. this beef between the behaves and nationals started when bryce harper hit a home run in the
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third inning. the braves pitch ter hul joel ter ran didn't appreciate the way he admired it and drilled him with the first pitch next time up. benches cleared but cooler heads prevailed. the team's official twitter accounts decided to take is the battle to cyber space. koun move, bro. the nationals responded with, which part? giving up the home run or drilling the 20-year-old on the first pitch his next time up? the twitter war would end there. the braves got the last laugh. they won the game for their 12th win in a row. you see these two handsome fellows here with the crazy haircuts? that's the manning brothers, both peyton and eli, they've shown us their comedic skills before on "saturday night live." this new directv commercial may be their greatest work ever. >> ♪ now is your chance to have football on your phone and in
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your pants ♪ ♪ look at this guy using his phone as a phone. >> your phone ain't for calling it's for football ♪ ♪ do you want that? >> he does, she does, our dad does ♪ ♪ does your dad want it? i mean ♪ ♪ football on your cell phone >> oh it, this is such a great commercial. if you didn't haven't directv of direct ticket before, be i'm sold. it's amazing >> i don't think they should give up their day jobs anytime soon. andy shows, thank you. the "cnn newsroom" begins after this very short break. stay with us. the same time.can take pictures seriously! yeah - and it's on verizon's network. sweet! we can stay in touch when we go to school next year. that's so great! get the samsung galaxy s 4 for only $148 on verizon - america's largest 4g lte network. walmart. [ female announcer ] some people like to pretend a flood could never happen to them. and that their homeowners insurance protects them.
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♪ this is the pursuit of perfection. happening now in the "newsroom," breaking news from the white house. president obama fires back at at vladimir putin, canceling his trip to moscow next month. that's not all from president obama. he also sat down on jay leno's couch for 45 minutes talking about terror, lunch with hillary, the olympics and trayvon martin. >> there are some things that we can do to foster better understanding and to make sure that we don't have laws in place that encourage the kind of violent encounter. >> and oprah winfrey adds her thoughts on racism. >> i think that one of the
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reasons why there's so much still lingering prejudice and racism is because we don't get to see people as ourselves. >> the talk show queen says that's part of the reason she's coming back to the big screen. "cnn newsroom" starts right now. good morning. i'm anna coren sitting in for carol costello. breaking news out of the white house. new fallout with russia over the edward snowden affair. president obama has canceled a visit to moscow next month for talks, direct talks that is, with president vladimir putin after russia granted asylum to the nsa leaker. phil black is in moscow. jill dougherty is at the state department. we start with jessica yellin. as we mentioned last hour, president barack obama will still be attending the g-20 summit in russia, but he won't be having these one-on-one talks
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with russian president vladimir putin. a major snub to russia, isn't it? >>. >> reporter: it sure is. it can only make relations between the two the men that much chillier. it's not warm to begin with. the white house says they began reviewing the summit in july and considering whether it made sense to do it or not. they have now informed russia the trip is off. clearly, it's because one important consideration was they could not come to terms on an extradition agreement for edward snowden or even some sort of wink and nod agreement whereby russia could extradite him for -- let him go to a second country which would then extradite him to the u.s. no progress there. and that was one knock against the summit. but in a statement, the white house also says some other contributing factors were a lack of progress between the two countries on issues including missile defense, arms control. they also say trade and global
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security, human rights and civil society, you know, some of the measures that in the next upcoming olympics in sochi create an inequality for gays and lesbians is a matter of some concern to the white house. there's also the matter of iran's march toward perhaps nuclear program in syria. the white house isn't coming to terms with putin on any agreements on any of those fronts. interestingly, anna, the statement says that the president asked to postpone the summit, not cancel it all together. that seems like a diplomatic nicety. instead of going to moscow, he is now going to stockholm, sweden, which is just a pleasant place close to moscow and important for trade relations and on climate change issues. so a visit nearby, but not vladimir putin. >> if i can bring in phil black now from moscow, phil, there was
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always going to be fallout from russia granting temporary asylum to nsa leaker edward snowden. we mentioned before that the relationship is rather tense between the two countries. has there been any reaction from russia? >> reporter: not so far, no. we've spoken to the kremlin and they seemed a little bit surprised by this news taking place today. they have not yet prepared any official public response, but this is certainly the last thing that the kremlin wanted to happen. throughout the snowden affair, the kremlin president putin himself has attempted to stress that snowden was not a problem of our making, they did not want this to affect broader u.s./russian relations because they believe very strongly that the big issues these two countries still have to discuss with much more important than snowden and they've always said the united states should look beyond snowden and talk about those sorts of issues. as you've heard, the response from the united states is we're angry about snowden and on those other issues like syria, missile defense and iran and so forth.
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the differences are so great, there have become so much greater over the last 1 months or so, that the u.s. feels very little point in holding this meeting. the issue now is what will the response be from the russian government. we don't know how long they will take to respond to this precisely. but it will certainly make for a frosty encounter when these two leaders get together at the bigger g-20 in st. petersburg. >> jill dougherty from the state department, you have covered russia extensively over the years. the relations between the two countries has never been good but you can only imagine that this will only worsen tensions. explain it to us. >> i mean, if you look at the statement, it really in addition to snowden, which is the latest, it's really a damning indictment of the entire relationship. look at the things they are saying, given our lack of progress on and then they go on, the white house, to mention missile defense, arms control, trade commercial relations,
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global security, human rights and civil society. that's about the relationship. so if that is not working, then where is the relationship? also i would say that will right at the top where they say, you know, we value the achievements we had in the first term, now, what they're not saying is the first term was with another russian president and that was president medvedev. what's unstated here though is that now there is the nut old russian president who is vladimir putin, and this relationship is going south. here are the problems. so in a sense, you could say although the names are not there, this really is pretty personal statement to where the relationship is right now and the very major problems. >> jill dougherty, phil black and jessica yellin, many thanks. meanwhile, president obama makes a return appearance to late night tv, but this time, very few laughs and lots of serious topics. in an appearance on the "tonight
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show," the president and jay leno discussed a wide range of concerns including the terror threat that has shut down 19 u.s. embassies and consulates around the world. >> everyone is concerned about these embassy closings. how significant is this threat? >> well, it's significant enough that we're taking every precaution. we had already done a lot to the bolster embassy security around the world. but especially in the middle east, north africa where the threats tend to be highest. and whenever we see a threat stream that we think is specific enough that we can take some specific precautions within a certain time frame, then we do so. >> the president also addressed the killing of an unarmed teen in florida and the acquittal of the man hop pulled the trigger. >> i thought you spoke very eloquently about the trayvon martin case. i could tell that you were speaking from the heart. and tell me about that.
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>> what i wanted to try to explain was why this was a particularly sensitive topic for african-american families because you know, a lot of people who have sons know the experience they had of being followed or. >> sure. >> you know, being viewed suspiciously. we all know that, you know, young african-american menman disproportionately have involvement in criminal activities and violence. for a lot of reasons, a lot of it having to do with poverty, a lot of it having to doing with disruptions in their neighborhoods and their communities and failing schools and all those things. that's no excuse, but what we also believe in is that people, everybody should be treated fairly and the system should work for everyone. >> and in one of the lighter moments, the president looked ahead to hillary clinton's potential run to succeed him. >> you and hillary had lunch.
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who invited who to lunch? i'm curious. >> i invited her. >> okay. >> and we had a great time. she had that post administration glow, you know, when folks leave the white house, like two weeks later, they look great. >> did you notice her measuring the drapes or anything like that? >> keep in mind, she's been there before. >> that's true. >> she doesn't have to measure them. yeah. >> she certainly doesn't. well, let's take a closer look at those comments. joining me from atlanta, political science professor and contributor jason johnson. what struck you most about that 45-minute conversation? considering that this was the first time the president actually addressed the latest security threats against u.s. interests. >> i was amazed at the range. i mean, jay leno literally started with making jokes about birthdays and anniversaries and then moved right into russia. and i was amazed at the simple
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flow with which they moved from trayvon martin it hillary clinton to so many different subject areas. probably one of the most extensive interviews we've seen with the president since the end of last year's election. >> some very serious issues discussed. what is "the tonight show" the right forum to discuss such wide-ranging and important significant topics? >> i think it is. look, the president of the united states has an obligation to tell us what he's doing every day. with our tax money, with our military, with our government in general. and so i've always thought it was reasonable why it was george bush, bill clinton, ronald reagan, any president who takes the time to speak to the american people where they are, be that's his obligation. i thought it was a good idea. as long as is he doesn't choose to only speak to jay leno, i think this is fine for obama to do. >> to stay on the issue of the terror alerts because that is obviously major news at the moment, 19 embassies and consulates, u.s. consulates closed around the world. there were drone strikes in
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yemen, two attacks were foiled also in yemen. there's obviously a lot of things happening behind the scenes that we don't know about. as you say, the president comes on jay leno sort of tells us what he can tell us. but do you think perhaps he was able to allay fears as to the terror alert that americans are exposed to at the moment? >> i don't think so. i mean, and unfortunately, it's because i think fear is just a part of american life now. i mean, since 9/11, we're sort of dulled to the pain, but we live with the expectation that the men and women who are fighting abroad in the middle east, that the men and women who work for the foreign services are constantly under threat. this may be a slightly higher threat but i don't think there's anything the president can do to convince americans that those of us we are concerned abroad are safe. all he can do is say i'm doing my best to keep them safe. >> jason johnson, lovely insight there always good talking to you. thank you very much. stay with us. at the bottom of the hour, we'll
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hear more of the president's comments, a lot more. we'll have that for you at 10:30 eastern. let's now turnton southern california where a massive manhunt is under way for this man, james dimaggio who police believe he killed a southern california woman in a fire and then kidnapped the woman's daughter, hannah anderson. hannah's brother ethan is also missing. now, their father is making a desperate plea to his wife's alleged killer and to his daughter who may be with him. >> jim, i can't fathom what you were thinking. the damage is done. i'm begging you to let my daughter go. you've taken everything else. hannah, we all love you very much. if you have a chance, you take it. you run. you'll be found. >> miguel marquez is in san diego following the story. miguel, has there been any progress in the search?
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>> there's progress in the sense that investigators are hearing from a lot of individuals about possible leads. they say they are tracking down dozens of leads here through the san diego county sheriff's department. they are asking anybody who sees this individual and or these kids, they believe that mr. dimaggio may have changed his appearance. they were last seen in a blue nissan versa. they could have changed that vehicle, as well. if hannah, the 16-year-old girl is with him, her appearance may have been changed and if the boy ethan is with them, his appearance may also be changed. another thing investigators are trying to track down is who is the child that was found dead in the rubble of that burned out house. it is possible it could be that of 8-year-old ethan. so it could only be that mr. dimaggio and 16-year-old hannah are on the loose right now. and they are also saying that he is considered very dangerous.
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he may be armed. and if you see them or even suspect that it may be them, call 911, do not confront them. anna? >> miguel, the father of those children, he made a plea, a direct plea and referred to the suspect as jim. can you describe the relationship? because suc only assume it's platonic that they know each other. >> reporter: they do know each other. they know each other quite well apparently from the past. jim or james dimaggio has known the kids, has known the family since they were born, according to friends and family that we've spoken to. everybody says that he is a low key introverted mellow sort of guy, would never ever see something like this coming. so it comes out of complete left field. it has people shocked. confused. and now they are just hoping that this turns out as good as it can. anna? >> miguel marquez joining us from san diego. thank you for that.
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well, a deadly will bird flu virus has never been known to pass between two people, but now doctors in china say it has happened between a father and his daughter. dr. sanjay gupta is here to break down what exactly that means. [ male announcer ] come to the golden opportunity sales event to experience the precision handling of the lexus performance vehicles, including the gs and all-new is. ♪ this is the pursuit of perfection. just by talking to a helmet. it grabbed the patient's record before we even picked him up. it found out the doctor we needed was at st. anne's. wiggle your toes. [ driver ] and it got his okay on treatment from miles away. it even pulled strings with the stoplights. my ambulance talks with smoke alarms and pilots and stadiums. but, of course, it's a good listener too. [ female announcer ] today cisco is connecting the internet of everything. so everything works like never before.
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of bird flu has passed one person to another, and it appears to be the first time that it's happened. cnn chief medical correspondent dr. sanjay gupta joins us now. what can you tell us about this recent case? >> you know, we've been following this for some time and we're talking about a specific type of influenza virus known at h 7 n 9. a lot of people don't remember the numbers. it's important to distinguish this from h 5 n 1, a type of bird flu we talked about several years ago. these cases seem to be mainly isolated to china. one case in taiwan. but that's the virus you're looking at there. that's where this virus is located. there have been 134 of these patient who have gotten sick and 43 people have died. anna, to your question, two of those cases were a father and a daughter. the father was a man who spent a
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lot of time with poultry, with chickens. and he became sick, five to six days after spending time with these infected chickens. his daughter was subsequently caring for him and she also contracted the virus. we know that the daughter didn't spend time with the birds, so she didn't get it that way. we also know the exact same genetically matched virus was found in father and daughter. so this was a clear case of human-to-human spread, something that scientists look for both father and daughter, unfortunately, died from this. so this is what's sort of governing all the tension today. >> sanjay, as you know, i'm based in hong kong which has had its fair share of bird scares over the year. should that be of concern for the rest of the world if it is spreading from human to human? >> yeah, look, i think that the time to sound the alarm bells is not quite here yet. i'll give you a couple reasons why. first of all, this is documented human-to-human transmission.
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scientists had suspected this for some time, but this man had also had contact with 43 other close contacts during that time. and none of them became infected. so while it can spread human to human, it doesn't seem to be happening very easily. also, we're talking about it now in august, but this happened back in march. and we haven't had evidence of many more cases of human to human transition since then. i think they want to keep an eye on this and see if this particular virus mutates to something more easily transmissible. for now it's more keeping an eye on it, not sounding the alarm bells. >> dr. gupta, thank you for the update. it had to be a pretty rock solid role to bring oprah winfrey back to the big screen. next, our nischelle turner talks with the queen of talk about her character in the new movie, "the butler." >> i'm sorry, mr. butler. >> everything you are and everything you have --
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welcome back. for the first time in 15 years, oprah winfrey is back on the silver screen. lee daniels "the butler" tells
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the story of a black man who leaves the georgia cotton fields to work at the white house. he gets a front row seat to some of the most historic moments of the 20th century. it opens august 16th. cnn entertainment correspondent nischelle turner got to sit down with the queen of talk to discuss the film and much, much more and initial joins us now. nischelle, what a treat to sit down with oprah. >> i'm telling you, anna, it really, really was. we are reporters and biased reporters. when you get the opportunity to talk to a lady who literally changed the face of television, it is a real treat. you know it's going to be a lively conversation with oprah when she gives you a high five, like her way of saying bring it on. so i did. we talked about the movie and her role as gloria gaines, the butler's wife. we also talked about the movie's message and why it took so long for her to take on another role. >> so your first dramatic role in 15 years can you believe
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that, nischelle? can you believe it? i know, really. what made me say yes to that. >> that was my question. >> especially since i was going through it. i was going through building own and thank goodness we were on the other side at least headed in the right direction for that. i said to lee, this is worst time you could ask me to do anything, lee. and you know, he just would not take no for an answer. i think one of the reasons why there's so much. still lingering prejudice and racism is because we don't get to see people as ourselves. and so this was an opportunity, i thought, to let the world feel the heart of the butler, the heart of this period that really was a defining period in the lives of many black people but also our nation. >> i was going to say, will this generation that sees this movie today, do you think they'll get cecil gains? will they look at him as weak because he didn't speak out?
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>> i certainly hope not. you know what i hope this generation looks and sees, they see their own fathers. that's what i hope they look and see and see their own fathers and recognize that there were different ways of being a warrior. that moment in the film where cecil gains goes in and says the white help is making more than the black help here, and i think that's not fair and we should get equal pay, that is his way of warrioring. >> the conversation that is had in this film about race, race relations, racism, we're still having that conversation today. >> i think we'll be having that conversation. >> do you think. >> for a long time because you know, all of this, the conversations about race, and the conversations about profiling regardless of what race is being profiled is really about our march to humanity. it's about our march to not fearing one another. and i think when you don't have stories and you don't have a placement in the culture where people can see that there's a whole tapestry, you know, one of the reasons why i love this film
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and wanted to be a part of it is because of the tenderness between the -- of the husband and wife and the tenderness and nurturing nature of the middle class family. you know, so many images. >> i've never seen that before. >> i know you hadn't seen it before. i know. >> seriously, i'd never seen that before. >> isn't that just shocking? and when i ask other people, white people, black people, when have you seen a tenderness and honor and respect and -- people who have been together and can finish each other's sentences and you can see the caring, the caring happens not just when they're in bed together, cecil and gloria, but when they're sitting at the table and finishing each other's sentences and saying, what is the name of that movie. >> "in the heat of the night." >> in the heat of the night. you can feel that. >> do you feel like you still experience racism in any form? >> nobody's going to come up to me and call me the "n" word
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unless they're on twitter and i can't find them. >> twitter thugs. >> twitter thugs. the twitter thugs. so i've learned to leave the twitter thugs alone. so unless it's something ridiculous, nobody's going do it. but i experience racism in ways that you experience when you have reached a level where people can't call you to your face by -- i experience it through people's expectations and lack thereof. i use it to my advantage. it's a wonderful thing when people count you out because they think you can't do something. it's a wonderful thing. i always say this. there's a poem by myall angelou caused "our grandmothers." there's a line in there that says "when i walk into the room, i come as one but i stand as 10,000." so when he i walk into the room and i'm the only one stand in there, i'm the only one, doesn't bother me a bit.
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>> can you just ask you quickly about the good news that you got earlier this week that own is going to turn a profit six months ahead of schedule. >> thank you so much for that. from the beginning, nischelle, everyone told me it was going to take five years. but i think because it was my name on the channel, there was an expectation that people were just going to automatically turn on the tv and even though nothing was there, they were going to just sit there and watch nothing. so we had to build the channel. now, i always believed that it was going to take some time. what threw me off was when i finished the show and then everybody said, well, be why isn't it done yet in but what will i do when the going gets rough, there's no such thing as quitting. i have to -- i sit with myself. i go inside and i say, all right. what is the next right move? what do i need to do to turn this around? and that's what we did. we did. not i, but my team, sherri,
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salada, eric logan, we had many, many, many many nights. >> jesus come to the table. >> honey, jesus was at the table. jesus was at the table. that's why we're moving forward because jesus was at the table. >> thank you. >> thank you very much. >> jesus was at that table, anna. that's what she said. you know the story of the butler was important for her to tell because her mother was a maid and her grandmother was a maid and her great grandmother was a slave. so she comes from a long line of domestics and says she stands on their shoulders today. so she really wants that story to be celebrated. and i've seen the movie twice. and anna, i will tell you, it definitely will give you something to talk about and it's it will resonate with everyone. >> is there anything oprah can't do? she's just such an extraordinary woman. have we got an oscar contender on our hands? do you think the butler is up
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for several oscars? >> to answer the first part of your question, there may be one thing she doesn't do as well as other people. oprah's got dancing scenes in the mean. she's always said not the greatest dancer, but she breaks it down in in movie. it's very, very cute moment. that's a big part of this movie kind of, how this family interacts and relates. oprah loves to dance and does it a lot in this movie. it is definitely getting a lot of buzz. i can tell you that i have not seen oprah totally surrender to a character and a role liking this since she played sophia in "color purple." and she goss an oscar nomination for that. i think she was really, really committed to this character and this role. forest whitaker was understated but very elegant as cecil gains. there's -- it's a great ensemble film. get this dwight eisenhower is played by robin williams. jane fonda plays nancy reagan.
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there's so many oscar winners and oscar nominated actors. lee daniels does a really good job putting it all together and giving them a chance to shine. >> nischelle, i refuse to believe that oprah can't dance. i'm going to have to check out the movie myself. >> black and white jump suit in the '70s with the fro, honey, it is fabulous. >> nischelle turner, good to see you as always. cnn "newsroom." much more after the break. [ tires screech ]
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if you tuned in to watch jay leno last night, you might have experienced a bit of whiplash today. president obama sat on the famous set for 45 minutes, fielding questions on a dpren net tick range of questions from terrorism to trayvon martin to the 2016 presidential race. take a listen. >> you and hillary had lunch. who invited who to lunch? i'm curious. >> i invited her. >> okay. >> and we had a great time. she had that post administration
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glow. you know, when folks leave the white house, two weeks later, this he look great. >> yeah. >> you know? but it was a wonderful conversation. you know, by the end of my first term, you know, we had become genuinely close and i could not have more respect for her. she was a great secretary of state. and yeah, very, very fine work she did. >> did you notice her measuring the drapes or anything like that? >> keep in mind, she's been there before. so. >> that's true. >> she doesn't have to measure them. >> everyone is concerned about these embassy closings. how significant is this threat? >> well, it's significant enough that we're taking every precaution. we had already done a lot to bolster embassy security around the world. but especially in the middle east, north africa where the threats tend to be highest. and whenever we see a threat stream ta we think is specific
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enough that we can take some specific precautions within a certain time frame, then we do so. >> safe to say we learned about these threats through the sa intelligence program? is that a fair assessment. >> we don't have a domestic spying program. we do have mechanisms where we can track a phone number or an e-mail address that we know is connected to some sort of terrorist threat. and you know, that information is useful, but you know, what i've said before, you be know, i want to make sure i repeat. and that is, we should be skeptical about the potential encroachments on privacy. none of the revelations show that government has actually abused these powers, but they're pretty significant powers. and i've been talking to congress and civil libertarians and others about, are there additional ways that we can make sure the people know nobody's listening to your phone call. >> were you surprised that russia granted snowden asylum?
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>> i was disappointed because you know, even though we don't have an extradition treaty with them, traditionally, we have tried to respect if there's a lawbreaker or an alleged lawbreaker in their country. we evaluate it and we try to work with them. they didn't do that with us. and in some ways it's reflective of some underlying challenges that we've had with russia lately. >> i thought you spoke very eloquently about the trayvon martin case. i could tell that you were speaking from the heart and tell me about that. >> well, you know, i think all of us were troubled by what happened. and any of us who are parents can imagine the heart ache that those parents went through. it doesn't mean that trayvon was a perfect kid. none of us were. we were talking off stage, you know, you're a teenager. especially a teenage boy. >> right. >> you're going to mess up.
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and you won't always have the best judgment. but what i think all of us agree to is that we should have a criminal justice system that's fair, that's just, and what i wanted to try to explain was why this was a particularly sensitive topic for african-american families because you know, a lot of people who have sons know the experience they had of being followed or you know, being viewed suspiciously. we all know that you know, young african-american men disproportionately have involvement in criminal activities and violence for a lot of reasons, a lot of it having to do with poverty, a lot of it having to do with you know, disruptions in their neighborhoods and their communities, failing schools and all those things. and that's no excuse, but what we also believe in is that people, everybody should be treated fairly and the system
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should work for everyone. >> let me ask you something. you told a group of young people that will broccoli was your favorite food. now, lying to voters is one thing. lying to children, that's -- that's -- that is. >> let me say this. >> can you put your right hand on the bible and say broccoli. >> let me say this. i have broccoli a lot. you can ask my staff. it is one of my staples. me and broccoli, i don't know. we got a thing going. >> really. >> it goes especially well with burgers and fries. absolutely. >> did michele break a broccoli cake with the broccoli icing? >> i won't go that far. >> mr. president, it's been an honor. i know you have to go. >> before we go, well, jay, i know you're very proud of your car collection. >> yeah. >> well, there's one piece that's missing. >> cool! >> this is the -- this is the beast. what i drive in. >> look at that. >> my friend ed well burn
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designed that car. >> so -- >> will you sign the roof? >> i will sign the roof. >> cool. >> now, the doors are heavy. when you're getting in. you may need a little help. >> i assume is the real car will be at my garage after the show tonight. >> there you go, jay. >> very good. >> mr. president, a pleasure and an honor sir. >> i appreciate it. >> thank you very much. >> during the 45-minute conversation, the president also said he was disappointed with russia's new anti-gay laws and that he hopes the country doesn't try to discriminate when it hosts next year's winter olympics. just ahead in the "newsroom," after committing murders that shocked a nation, we'll tell you how james wolcott went from teenaged killer tore popular professor. ♪
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college has learned one of its most well regarded professors
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was keeping a sinister secret. james wolcott was just 15 years old when he shot his parents and sister. but now he uses dr. james st. james, a popular professor at millikin university. ted rowlands has the story. >> august 4, 1967 inside this home in georgetown, texas, police found the bodies i've college professor, his wife and their 17-year-old daughter. within hours, 15-year-old james wolcott admitted he had killed his family, using this .228 caliber rifle. wolcott told police he hated his parents and sister and claimed he had been sniffing glue in the weeks before he murdered them. the story sent shock waves through the small town and made headlines around the country. the next year, james wolcott was tried as an adult but found not guilty by reason of insanity. seven years after that the in 1974, he was deemed sane and set free. >> after that, wolcott seemed to
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just disappear until a texas newspaper reporter tracked him down here in the central illinois town of decatur, where he's been teaching psychology at millikin university for the past 27 years. here he is now. his name is dr. james st. james. he's the head of the psych department at millikin and a student favorite. >> he's very intelligent. he's almost a genius. he could lecture for hours without notes and he just know scenarios everything off the top of his head. >> reporter: some people are upset st. james didn't tell the university about his past when he was hired. decatur citi councilman told the local flup, if i were a parent and my kids were going to millikin, that's something i would want to know. the university though is standing by st. james saying, given the traumatic experiences of his childhood, dr. st. james' effort to rebuild his life and obtain a successful professional career have been remarkable.
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>> there are some people that want him to step down. what are your thoughts? >> i think he should stay. he's been a great professor. he has no reason to leave unless he does something here. you know? he has no reason top step down. >> we tried to contact st. james who is now 61 at his home and by e-mail, but got no response. even with his secret now out, the university is expecting he'll be back in the classroom when school resumes at the end of the month. ted rowlands, cnn, decatur, illinois. >> still ahead is the house where arizona yell castro kept three women captive for a decade is now reduced to rubble. you'll hear the emotional words from one of the survivors. ♪
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welcome back. ariel castro's cleveland house now obliterated. one of his victims michele knight returned to witness the demolition. knight handed out balloons and read a prayer. >> missing people strength and power to know that they are loved. we hear their cries. they are never forgotten in my heart. they are caterpillars waiting to turn into a butterfly. >> cnn's martin savidge is covering the demolition. martin, what is the feeling within the community now that the house of horrors is gone? >> reporter: you know, it's kind
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of a mixed thing here. i talked to a number of people how do they feel about this day. it's happiness. i guess. it's also a lot of sadness. so it's really mixed in a way that people can't quite put their finger on it but point out they're glad to see the house gone which you can see is just about gone. they're down to the basement. on top of that, there is a joy i guess of finally moving on as it were. and you know, one of those that got to launch the first blow was jean nap dejesus's aunt. thee got to get in the giant excavator and deliver the first punch to the house and really took a chunk out of the roof much to the delight of the crowd that were watching here. so it's a day that people are really kind of drinking in. the church bells were ringing at one point. it's just kind of trying to find that closure here. i know that's a well-worn word but that is exactly what the street is looking for. and they hope by the end of the day, there will be nothing left
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of that house and maybe in a few months, a park or a playground for children, something completely different from the house of horrors as it was known. anna? >> martin, where to now? you know, these women, what they've endured over the past decade, now that this house of horrors is gone, that decade of hell, if you like, is behind them, i can be only assume there's a great deal of rehabilitation for these women to i guess get their lives back on track. >> reporter: there is. i mean, they've got a long way to go. their attorneys will tell you that. you saw michele. they're on their way. that is the best thing you can say after so much. >> martin savidge, lovely to see you. thank you so much. we'll be right back. of the available lexus enform,y including the es and rx. ♪ this is the pursuit of perfection. ♪ geico's defensive driver,ke 13. good student and multi-policy discounts
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in these dog days of summer, jeanne moos uncovers a new method to soak up sweat. >> when you're wet or sweaty, this is how most folks mop up. when you don't have a hanky handy, show me the money. that's a 50 euro note this guy's deployed to take care of excess liquidity. the equivalent of around 66 bucks. >> where is the money going? >> there he was in the background of an interview taking place at a horse race in ireland. talk about money needing laundered. who wants this on their face.
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2002 study showed 94% of bills tested contain pathogens, remind us of the time in zombieland supply haven't cried like that since tie tannic. >> when woody harrelson uses cash to wipe away tears. the guy who used theyer to mop up rain drops could have left his cash in his pocket if he had supporters like mitt romney did. >> thank you. >> during the last presidential campaign, this restaurant owner came to mitt's rescue whether or not mitt wanted rescue. >> i can't let our next president look all sweaty like this in a photograph. >> restaurant owner then tried to wipe off a piece of napkin left on mitt's lower lip. but this time mitt kept a stiff upper lip and did it himself. president george w. bush had his own moment he would freefrl prefer to be wiped from memory. >> top ten george bush video moments. >> during a commercial break on his show, president bush used the sweater of an unsuspecting
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show staffer to clean his eyeglasses. if that rubs you the wrong way, this may rub you the right way. >> oh, my god. oh, my god. >> this deer kept rubbing his head on a teenager sitting on a beach in british columbia as his mom shot the video. experts say the deer's either probably trying to rub fur off his antlers or leaving his scent that comes out of a gland on his forehead. some thought that's not all. that was an upsetting piece of video. >> all this weird rubbing, is enough to make you rub your eyes in disbelief. >> careful. it's not hurting, is it. >> yeah, that might hurt. >> jeanne moos, cy new york. >> thanks for joining us. cnn "newsroom" continues right cnn "newsroom" continues right after the break. -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com
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good morning, everyone. i'm ashleigh banfield. good to have you with us. i want to begin in southern california where a desperate father is waiting to learn the fate of his two kids. 16-year-old hannah and 8-year-old ethan anderson went business hadding after their mother was killed and her body and the body of an unidentified child were found burned in a home. brett anderson made an impassioned plea to the man accused of killing that woman